Mount Aloysius College Student-Run Interpreting Conference

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Mount Aloysius College

3rd Biennial Student-Run Interpreting Conference

April 7-9, 2017

Register

This link will take you to the online registration page.

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On-site registration is possible for an additional cost of $10.00. On-site payment is limited to cash or check.

Click here to sponsor or donate to the conference.

Conference registration includes:

  • Conference opening reception and Deaf Gathering (Friday 5:00pm-7:00pm)
  • Entertainment: ASL Slam (Friday)
  • Breakfast (Saturday and Sunday)
  • Keynote presentation (Saturday)
  • All workshop sessions (Saturday & Sunday)
  • Exhibit Hall entry (Saturday)
  • Buffet Lunch (Saturday)
  • Entertainment: TBA
Refund Policy: 50% refunds will be given until March 25. After March 25, no refund will be given. Thank You.
T-shirts are an additional $15 (an additional fee will be added for larger sizes).  Include your size while registering. 
Contact Information & Directions

The conference is being held on the Mount Aloysius College campus.

7373 Admiral Peary Highway, Cresson, PA 16630 – Directions

Questions about registration?

Please contact the student conference committee at InterpretingConference@mtaloy.edu, if you have any questions related to this conference. If you have questions about MAC’s ASLEI program, please contact Professor Kierstin Muroski at kmuroski@mtaloy.edu

Exhibitors

$25 for table at expo. Pay for the table online here.

Schedule/Bios

View the Interpreting Conference schedule here. (PDF)

*Schedule subject to change

Workshop and Presenter Biographies

Saturday April 8, 2017
9:10 am-11:10 am:

  • Understanding Your “Blackbox”
    • Description: This workshop explores processing models including those of Betty Colonomos, Daniel Gile, and Dennis Cokely as they apply to the work of interpreters. Participants will discuss the “black box” – what is going on in their minds while they interpret and how to take control of elements within their interpreting (leaks, processing blindness, and task saturation).  These elements will then be applied to simulated work samples to familiarize participants with levels of mental energy used while interpreting.
    • Presenter Biography: Loriel Dutton hails from Los Angeles, California and now lives in Washington DC where she is a staff interpreter/mentorship coordinator.  She holds national certification (NIC) from RID and has been interpreting professionally since 2005.  She graduated with a Masters of Education in Interpreting Pedagogy from Northeastern University and a baccalaureate degree in Deaf Studies from California State University, Northridge (CSUN). Areas of expertise include mentoring interpreters, diagnostic assessment, and interpreting in science, research, and educational contexts.
    • Presenter Biography: Jennifer Breisch is a freelance Interpreter in the Philadelphia area, and works in the tristate region.  She holds RID NIC certification and has been interpreting for eight years.  She earned a Bachelor of Arts in English from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania with a concentration in Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and an Associate Degree in American Sign Language / English Interpreting from the Community College of Philadelphia.  One of her biggest passions is working with and mentoring interpreting students and interpreters who are starting out in the profession.
  • Introduction to Demand Control Schema and Supervision
    • Description: What value does talking with colleagues about the decisions you make during an interpreting assignment have?  The purpose of this workshop is to give an overview of the constructs of Dean & Pollard’s Demand-Control schema and update participants on current research and best practices process for utilizing the model.  Participants will learn how this decision making model can overlay current cognitive process models that we already use.  In his book, The Courage to Teach, Parker Palmer says, “The growth of any craft depends on shared practice and honest dialogue among the people who do it.”  Supervision is a structured way professionals dialogue about their work with one other in order to analyze decisions made during interpreting assignments. Participants will view a videotaped supervision session and discuss how supervision can be applied to our own work.  Other practice professions use this approach to help move their work to the next level.  This workshop will help inform your work immediately when you step into an assignment.
    • Presenter Biography: Daniel Maffia obtained his bachelor’s degree in American Sign Language/English Interpreting with a minor in Communication from the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology in 2009. In 2010 he became nationally certified and most recently Daniel earned his Master’s in Interpreting Studies with an emphasis in Teaching Interpreting from Western Oregon University in 2014.  He has work experience in a variety of settings. Currently he is a lecturer with the department of American Sign Language and English Interpreting Department’s Interpreter Training Program at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf.  Previous Daniel served as a staff interpreter in the Department of Access Services at the Rochester Institute of Technology.  Daniel continues to work as both a Video Relay Interpreter at Sorenson Communication and a freelance community interpreter. Daniel has shown his commitment to the field by serving on the board of directors for his local affiliate RID chapter for the past two years. In addition he has been a mentor for both practicum students and colleagues.  Finally Daniel’s research interests relate to Supervision and Demand-Control Schema. During his research Daniel had the opportunity to facilitate supervision for various interpreters both spoken language and sign language.  Daniel continues to serve as a facilitator for various supervision groups in addition to presenting workshops relating to supervision and reflective practices in the field of interpreting.  Daniel has served as an adjunct faculty member at both the American Sign Language and English Interpreting Department’s Interpreter Training Program at the National Institute for the Deaf and the Modern Languages Department at Onondaga Community College.

9:10 am – 12:15 am:      

  • Translating “Sense”: Capturing meaning in target texts
    • Description: This seminar will introduce the participants to a model of meaning based on research into the interpreting process and the field of pragmatics. The focus of the training will be on the multi-dimensional meaning of English phrases and their possible translations into ASL. The proposed model consists of literal meaning (where polysomic words are disambiguate, and both references and deictic expressions are “fixed”), enriched paraphrases (where some information is added to clarify triggers for enrichment), and finally implicatures (where the signs/grammar chosen by the interpreter does not correspond to the words/grammar in the English text but which capture one of the speaker’s potential meanings).
    • Presenter Biography: Campbell McDermid, PhD (NIC, COI) is an Assistant Professor at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology. His research and publications encompass translation theory, discourse, identity and Groupthink, pragmatics, cohesion, accuracy and assessment. His work has helped him to develop a model of interpretation that conceptualizes “sense” at different levels and he continues to explore the application of pragmatics and various theories of translation to the work of interpreters. His accomplishments include national certification in Canada and the United States, several decades of conference work, and he designed the current system of assessment used by the province of Ontario. In addition, he helped to develop the stimulus materials for the national interpreter certification system in Canada and served as an assessor.

11:15 am – 12:15 pm:

  • PA Sign Language Interpreter Laws: What You Should Know
    • Presenter: Sharon Behun
  • Exploring accessibility and transcreation between written English and ASL.
    • Description: In 2015, RID voted to have all articles submitted to the Journal of Interpretation (JOI), an international journal on signed language interpreting to have an ASL translation. The editorial board was not included in this decision. As of this printing, there is no answer on how and when this will be instituted. It is further complicated by the fact that as an international journal not all authors are American and therefore not users / speakers of ASL. For over five years, Street Leverage (SL) a popular blog amongst signed language interpreters and deaf people has been providing their readers with both an English and ASL version of submitted material from authors across the US. In most cases, the author of the article, hearing or deaf, has translated their own written work into ASL. On a smaller scale at least, SL can provide RID and potential authors a sense of what this new change means for the JOI. This presentation reports on an analysis of SL articles. Translation and transcreation theories are explored to frame the analysis of the predicted effectiveness of JOI’s new requirement. It also posits concerns for what the JOI will likely need to address in future publications.
    • Presenter Biography: Robyn K. Dean, CI/CT and PhD: Robyn has been a nationally certified signed language interpreter for over twenty-five years with particular service in the field of healthcare. Her scholarship in decision-making and ethics in community interpreting is recognized internationally. Robyn has over twenty publications, all of which focus on the theoretical and pedagogical frameworks used to advance the practice of community interpreters. She is currently an Assistant Professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology, where she is the lead instructor on the institute’s postgraduate degree in healthcare interpretation. Robyn also consults on postgraduate degrees for signed language interpreters in Europe.

1:20 pm – 2:20 pm

  • PARID
    • Description: Are you wondering what PARID is? Do you want to know what PARID does? Are you interested in becoming involved? Come to this information session and have all of your questions answered!
    • Presenter Biography: LaTanya Jones is the current President of PARID. She has served PARID in several capacities over the past 12 years. She works as a Freelance interpreter and her preferred setting is healthcare.
  • Passive Voice for Interpreters
    • Description: If you heard the sentence: “I was fired.” or “My son was bitten by another child.” and you’re not cognizant of passive voice constructions inherent in those sentences, you should come to this workshop.  These oversights are more than likely affecting your interpretations, as well!  The goal of this presentation is to make participants aware of passive voice and its usages in English.  Passive voice is used for very specific purposes in English.  These purposes coupled with American phone culture make for a sticky situation for interpreters.  This workshop will teach participants about passive voice, telephone culture, and ways to interpret messages into passive and active voice.
    • Presenter Biography: Jamie L. McCartney, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor and program coordinator of the sign language interpreting program at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio.  She has national certification from the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf.  She has worked as an interpreter in this social justice profession in a variety of settings since getting her A.A.S. in interpreting in 1993.  She has worked in postsecondary, platform, deaf/blind, K-12, video relay service, personal, social services, medical, and employment settings.  She loves English grammar, more specifically, passive voice in English and the correct production of it in ASL.  Her recent research interest is that of Grit Theory and its application to sign language interpreters who leave the profession. Her article “Is grit the X-factor for sign language interpreters who remain in the profession?” was published April 2016 in The International Journal of Translation & Interpreting Research. More recently, she has been working on a book chapter on deafness that will be published in the spring of 2017.
  • The Mentoring Relationship
    • Description: Come and learn about finding a mentor for your internship, or professional development. The presenter has been involved in mentoring for almost 20 years. She has worked and maintained a mentoring relationship over the past four years. The relationship started as a college requirement for the mentee and has spanned many states and has stayed intact. It all starts with an interview. This will be an interactive workshop, come and find out, everything you need to know about being a mentor or mentee.
    • Presenter Biography: Jill Baker MA CI, CT, Ed: k-12 has been a professional interpreter for the past 25 years and is currently working as a DI at Geisinger Medical Center. She also works in various freelance settings to include K-12; as an interpreter and a coordinator, Post-Secondary, medical, VRS, legal, mental health and religious settings.  Jill holds an AAS as an Interpreter Technician from Milwaukee Area Technical College holds a BSI from WOSC (Western Oregon State College) and has a MA in Communications from Regent University.  She enjoyed teaching in the interpreter training program as an adjunct instructor at her alma mater.

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

  • Healthcare interpreting: Using the NCIEC career lattice to assess competency
    • Description: Do you think you have what it takes to become a healthcare interpreter? In this workshop, participants will learn how to use the Healthcare Interpreting Career Lattice, developed by the CATIE Center/NCIEC to determine how to develop healthcare interpreting competency. Resources for improving content knowledge, including specialized vocabulary and discourse, settings and systems will also be explored.
    • Presenter Biography: Jeni Rodrigues, M.Ed., CI/CT, NIC-A, NAD-IV has worked as an ASL/English interpreter for 18 years in a variety of settings, including: medical, mental health, performance, legal, business, post-secondary and VRS. For the past three years, she has worked with a deaf internal medicine resident as her designated interpreter. She earned a M.Ed. degree in Interpreting Pedagogy from Northeastern University, a B.A. in Women’s Studies from California State University, Long Beach and she is currently a Ph.D. student at Gallaudet University in the Department of Interpretation and Translation. She has taught interpreting for five years in postsecondary institutions and corporate settings.
  • Depictions Constructed Action (in action)
    • Description: Ever wanted to make your interpretation more visually accessible?  Want to work smarter, not harder?  This is the workshop for you! Using both a hands-on approach, activities, and discussion, we’ll delve into the world of depiction and how to apply different forms of depiction to your work.
    • Presenter Biography: Loriel Dutton hails from Los Angeles, California and now lives in Washington DC where she is a staff interpreter/mentorship coordinator.  She holds national certification (NIC) from RID and has been interpreting professionally since 2005.  She graduated with a Masters of Education in Interpreting Pedagogy from Northeastern University and a baccalaureate degree in Deaf Studies from California State University, Northridge (CSUN). Areas of expertise include mentoring interpreters, diagnostic assessment, and interpreting in science, research, and educational contexts.
    • Presenter Biography: Jennifer Breisch is a freelance Interpreter in the Philadelphia area, and works in the tristate region.  She holds RID NIC certification and has been interpreting for eight years.  She earned a Bachelor of Arts in English from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania with a concentration in Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and an Associate Degree in American Sign Language / English Interpreting from the Community College of Philadelphia.  One of her biggest passions is working with and mentoring interpreting students and interpreters who are starting out in the profession.
  • Biomechanics for Interpreters
    • Description: This workshop will provide background information on the unfortunate common occurrence of musculoskeletal pain in sign language interpreters. Half of the workshop will be in lecture format and half will be facilitated, almost like an exercise class. Some of the exercises will be performed as a group and some will be performed at various stations set-up around the room. The learning will be fun and definitely, interactive. Sign language interpreters of all physical levels are encouraged to participate.
    • Presenter Biography: Daniel Maffia obtained his bachelor’s degree in American Sign Language/English Interpreting with a minor in Communication from the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology in 2009. In 2010 he became nationally certified and most recently Daniel earned his Master’s in Interpreting Studies with an emphasis in Teaching Interpreting from Western Oregon University in 2014.  He has work experience in a variety of settings. Currently he is a lecturer with the department of American Sign Language and English Interpreting Department’s Interpreter Training Program at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf.  Previous Daniel served as a staff interpreter in the Department of Access Services at the Rochester Institute of Technology.  Daniel continues to work as both a Video Relay Interpreter at Sorenson Communication and a freelance community interpreter. Daniel has shown his commitment to the field by serving on the board of directors for his local affiliate RID chapter for the past two years. In addition he has been a mentor for both practicum students and colleagues.  Finally Daniel’s research interests relate to Supervision and Demand-Control Schema. During his research Daniel had the opportunity to facilitate supervision for various interpreters both spoken language and sign language.  Daniel continues to serve as a facilitator for various supervision groups in addition to presenting workshops relating to supervision and reflective practices in the field of interpreting.  Daniel has served as an adjunct faculty member at both the American Sign Language and English Interpreting Department’s Interpreter Training Program at the National Institute for the Deaf and the Modern Languages Department at Onondaga Community College.

Sunday April 9, 2017
9:00 am – 12:00 pm:

  • Silencing the Negative Committee: Tools for Self-Validation
    • Description: We can mentally hold ourselves back from believing in our own strengths.  Even then, we can discover our patterns through reflection and learn new tools that help to Silence the Negative Committee and step into our Self-Validation. In a moment of doubt or denial, we prevent the spontaneous development that occurs within each challenge.   When our work is judged as “bad” we begin doubting ourselves, we deny intuitive listening or inferential learning.   Yet, this is where professional growth occurs, in our refection and determination.   We are accountable for our thoughts and actions.  …and that is where I start my workshops…
    • Presenter Biography: Bonnie Faye has been interpreting for 40 years, presenting for 25 years.  Her agency, Pula Legal Interpreting (1997), specializes in court and tri-lingual assignments in Mental Health environments (which opened new perspectives on presenting ethics). Bonnie is a Licensed Practitioner / Chaplin – (2007). Starting in educational interpreting (ECC-1978), freelance interpreter (1985), in the courts (1999) and VRS (2004), and is presently the team trial interpreter with Deaf District Attorney (2010). Bonnie brings laughter and activities to her workshops.  Get ready to open up, laugh and appreciate new ways of learning interpreting skills!
  • Keeping Interpreters Safe in a Violent World
    • Description: Unlike many other professions, interpreting requires the flexibility to work in a myriad of settings, with varied populations and potentially extenuating circumstances.  Over time, an interpreter could work in settings as varied as colleges, police stations, emergency rooms, counseling sessions, social security settings and jails.   As seen in the news on a daily basis, emergencies can arise in any of these settings which could compromise the safety of an interpreter.  Whether it is a random personal attack against you or those in your immediate environment, you may need to quickly make decisions and take actions to keep yourself safe.  This workshop is designed to provide you with the foundations to keep yourself safe. Topics will include, but not be limited to the following:  transitional spaces, bystander effect, particular settings of increased likelihood of danger, demographics of assaults,  weapons of opportunity, knife attacks, abduction, identification of hidden weapons, types of predators, situational awareness, use of technology, understanding the effects of fear,  pre-attack indicators, non-lethal defense tools.  Strategies involving active shooter situations will be discussed. Scenarios and strategies continue to be updated based upon relevant events that are occurring nationwide.
    • Presenter Biography: Stephen Holter, Psy. S., NAD IV, has over 25 years experience in the interpreting field, including free-lance and VRS settings. While working as a nationally certified school psychologist at a residential school for the Deaf, Stephen’s work included being called upon for crisis intervention services. Stephen’s background also includes third level certification in Krav Maga, a tactical mixed-martial art/combative and self-defense system that combines boxing, judo, jujitsu, Muay Thai and aikido. Stephen has received tactical pistol self-defense training subsequent to concealed carry permit training.
  • ASL Conversation and Idioms
    • Description: This day workshop will guide educational interpreters to understand how to incorporate these idiomatic expressions into your everyday use of ASL.
    • Presenter Biography: Maryjean Shahen is currently employed as an American Sign Language instructor at the University of Pittsburgh and is an adjunct instructor/interpreting team as a mentor at the Community College of Allegheny County. She holds a Professional level certification from American Sign Language Teacher Association. Mj was a Special Education teacher/Counselor with deaf children with disabilities such as deafblind, autism and special needs in the Peace Corps program in Kenya through Kenyan Sign Language.  Mj has a Master of Science degree with a specialty as an Education/ Rehabilitation counselor.
Deaf Gathering

Members of the region’s Deaf community are warmly invited to attend and be a guest of the College’s American Sign Language/English Interpreting department. There will be a nutritious dinner provided free of charge.

The Mount Aloysius College Deaf Gatherings offer the area’s deaf residents a consistent social opportunity. The idea of a regular social gathering for deaf neighbors has blossomed into a tradition for Mount Aloysius College. These Deaf Gatherings are great opportunities for our students of American Sign Language/English interpreting; the educational exchange is priceless. Experiences like these gatherings are great opportunities to learn about Deaf culture and to gain real experience in communication in a social setting.

Hotel

For overnight options, view this list of nearby hotels.

Our ASL/English Interpreting Programs

Here at Mount Aloysius College, we offer a nationally accredited baccalaureate program in American Sign Language/English Interpreting. We also offer a minor in American Sign Language. Click here for more information about our ASLEI program.

ASL/English Interpreting Major

American Sign Language Minor

Mission Statement

The aim of this conference is to advance the profession of American Sign Language-English Interpreting through a platform of information sharing via professional workshops and networking.  The audience of this conference is rich in diversity. Students of interpreting, professional interpreters, interpreting educators and mentors, as well as members of the broader interpreting community will gather to share their perspectives and insights of our profession. The conference is structured to encompass the range of knowledge and information held by students of interpreting to that of professional working interpreters. The Mount Aloysius college ASL/English Interpreting students organize, fund, and launch this event.

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